Courses

Courses

PHYS 103, Physics as a Liberal Art, 3 credits. A liberal-arts course in physics that presents physics as a human endeavor underlying the major technological advancements of the twentieth century. Topics include the scientific method, motion, energy, heat, light, relativity, the atom, fission, and fusion. No prior knowledge of physics is needed. One credit in high school algebra is required. Lecture and laboratory.

PHYS 131, The Solar System, 3 credits. A study of the structure and origin of the Solar System that includes historical views, a comparison of the planets and their satellites, and formation of the solar system. Lecture and laboratory..

PHYS 132, Stars and Galaxies, 3 credits. A study of the Sun, the life and death of a star, the interstellar medium, galaxies, and the past and future of the universe. Lecture and laboratory.

PHYS 145, Engineering Design I, 1 credit. Departmental resources, teamwork, problem-solving techniques.

PHYS 146, Engineering Design II, 1 credit. A continuation of PHYS 145.

PHYS 151, General Physics I, 4 credits. An introductory course in mechanics and heat. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: Official math placement or permission of instructor. Students may not receive credit for PHYS  151 and PHYS 161. PHYS 151 and PHYS 152 may be taken in either order.

PHYS 152, General Physics II, 4 credits. An introductory course in sound, electricity, magnetism, light, and modern physics. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: Official math placement or permission of instructor. Students may not receive credit for PHYS 152 and PHYS 162. PHYS 151 and PHYS 152 may be taken in either order.

PHYS 161, General Physics I with Calculus, 4 credits. A calculus-based introductory course in mechanics and heat. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: Official math placement or permission of instructor. Students may not receive credit for PHYS 151 and PHYS 161. PHYS 161 and PHYS 162 may be taken in either order.

PHYS 162, General Physics II with Calculus, 4 credits. An introductory course in sound, electricity, magnetism, light, and modern physics. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: Official math placement or permission of instructor. Students may not receive credit for PHYS 152 and PHYS 162. PHYS 161 and PHYS 162 may be taken in either order.

PHYS 188, 288, 388, 488, Special Topics, 1-3 credits. A course or seminar on a selected topic within the discipline that is not otherwise represented in the curriculum.

PHYS 210, Light and Atomic Physics, 3 credits. Kinetic theory, charged subatomic particles, atomic interaction with radiation, quantum mechanics, relativity, Bohr theory. Prerequisites: MATH 161, PHYS 152 or PHYS 162. Co-requisite: PHYS 211L.

PHYS 211L, Light and Atomics Physics Laboratory, 1 credit. Experiments in physical optics, atomic absorption and emission of light, microwaves, the ratio of charge to mass, x-rays and crystal structure, nuclear magnetic resonance. Co-requisite: PHYS 210..

PHYS 220, Nuclear Physics, 3 credits. Particle accelerators, detection of charge particles, the neutron, nuclear stability, nuclear reactions, nuclear forces, the shell model, beta decay, particle physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 210. Co-requisite, PHYS 211L.

PHYS 221L, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, 1 credit. Experiments in detecting charge particles, neutrons, and gamma rays. Counting statistics, radiation shielding, stopping power, scintillation counters, semiconductor detectors, the multichannel analyzer, time-of-flight techniques, analyzing bubble chamber photographs, detection electronics. Co-requisite: PHYS 220.

PHYS 245, Seismology, 3 credits. Origins of body waves through the earth. Interpreting seismological data. Earthquakes, plate tectonics, and Earth’s subsurface. Locating essential resources. Earth’s history. Analyzing and interpreting seismic records to identify, distinguish between, and locate body waves from natural and synthetic sources. Analyzing seismic data in relation to geological composition and structure. Hydrocarbon reservoirs. Constructing subsurface maps of the earth. Geophysical structure, water flow, environmental impact, profession ethics. Research project including written and oral reports. Prerequisite: PHYS 148. Co-requisite: PHYS 245L.

PHYS 245L, Seismology Lab, 1 credit. The laboratory for PHYS 245. Co-requisite: PHYS 245.

PHYS 248, Rock Mechanics, 3 credits. The mechanical behavior of rock. The response of rock masses and other geological materials to the force fields of their physical environment. Stress and strain. Elasticity and porosity. Applications in engineering and petroleum and natural gas practice. Rock structures in drilling and reservoir production. Protecting the environment. Underground excavations. Oil and gas wells. Structure and reinforcement systems. Instrumentation to evaluate natural resources. Mechanical stress in rock. Environmental impact. Prerequisite: PHYS 245.

PHYS 250, Electronics, 3 credits. DC and AC circuits. Semiconductor devices, rectifiers, amplifiers, oscillators. Prerequisites: MATH 161; PHYS 152 or PHYS 162. Co-requisite: PHYS 251L.

PHYS 251L, Electronics Lab, 1 credit. Multimeters, oscilloscopes, Thevenin’s theorem, Fourier analysis, Lissajous figures, timing circuits, transient and steady-state responses, transducers, diodes, transistors, operational amplifiers. Co-requisite: PHYS 25.

PHYS 260, Digital Electronics, 3 credits. Representing digital information, logic networks, integrated circuit technology, multiplexing, and microprocessors. Prerequisites: PHYS 152 or PHYS 162, Co-requisite: PHYS 261L.

PHYS 261L, Digital Electronics Laboratory, 1 credit. Logic circuits, number systems Boolean algebra, comparators, multiplexers, memories, multivibrators, shift registers, analog-to-digital conversion. Co-requisite: PHYS 260.

PHYS 305L, Electro-Optics Laboratory, 1 credit. Experiments in modern optics involving electromagnetic theory, including electron beam optics, the Kerr effect, fiber-optic wave guides, the monochromator, the ruby laser, nonlinear optics, the nitrogen laser, the tunable dye laser, and atomic excitation using lasers. Prerequisite: PHYS 210.

PHYS 309, Engineering Mechanics, 3 credits. Moments, couples, equivalent force systems, distribute force systems, equilibrium, free-body diagrams, static indeterminacy, friction, application of forces to engineering systems. Prerequisites: MATH 161; PHYS 152 or 162.

PHYS 310, Analytical Mechanics, 3 credits. Newtonian mechanics, linear oscillations, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics, central forces, dynamics of rigid objects. Prerequisites: MATH 162; PHYS 151 or 161; PHYS 152 or 162.

PHYS 311, Mechanics of Materials, 3 credits. Stress, strain, torsion, bending shear, pressure vessels, deflection of beams, buckling, energy methods. Prerequisites: MATH 162; PHYS 151 or 162; PHYS 152 or 162.

PHYS 320, Materials Science, 3 credits. Crystal structure and defects, stress, strain, theories of hardness and fracture, metallurgy. Prerequisites: PHYS 152 or 162; MATH 161. Co-requisite: PHYS 321L.

PHYS 321L, Materials Science Laboratory, 1 credit. Crystal structure, Young’s modulus, shear modulus polymers, elastomers, visible spectrophotometry, porosity, phase diagrams, viscosity, heat treatment. Co-requisite: PHYS 320.

PHYS 330, Solid State Physics, 3 credits. Thermal, optical, and electronic properties of solids. Metals, insulators, semiconductors. Magnetic resonance and superconductivity. Prerequisites: PHYS 152 or PHYS 162; MATH 162. Co-requisite: PHYS 331L.

PHYS 331L, Solid State Physics Lab, 1 credit. Impurities in semiconductors, x-ray spectrometry, the Hall effect, magnetic resonance, electron spin resonance, hysteresis, superconductivity. Co-requisite: PHYS 330.

PHYS 340, Engineering Thermodynamics, 3 credits. The first and second laws of thermodynamics, reversible  processes, PVT diagrams, non-ideal gases, enthalpy, entropy, heat engines, heat pumps, the Carnot cycle, efficiency, Maxwell’s relations, heat flow, thermodynamic systems. Prerequisites: MATH 161; PHYS 151 or 161.

PHYS 342, Quantum Mechanics, 3 credits. Solutions to the Schrodinger equation, the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, step potentials, tunneling, potential wells, harmonic oscillators, the hydrogen atom, approximation methods, Prerequisites: MATH 162; PHYS 151 or PHYS 161; PHYS 152 or PHYS 162.

PHYS 345L, Engineering Measurements Lab, 1 credit. Heat engines, the internal combustion engine, oscillations, fluid analysis, wind tunnels, strain gauges. Pre or co-requisite: PHYS 162.

PHYS 346, Sedimentology, 3 credits. The role of sediments. Derivation of information on depositional conditions. Evolution of sedimentary sequences and basins. The earth’s geological history. Uniformitarianism and stratigraphy. Conditions within lain sediments. Capacity of sedimentary rocks to generate deposits of petroleum, natural gas and other energy resource. Water quality. Professional ethics. Prerequisite: PHYS 245. Co-requisite: PHYS 347L.

PHYS 347L, Sedimentology Lab, 1 credit. The laboratory for PHYS 346. Co-requisite: PHYS 346.

PHYS 348, Earth Structure and Processes, 3 credits. Geophysics of the solid earth. The formation, structure, and composition of the earth. Interactions among crust, mantle, and core. Surface and internal dynamics. Mantle convection. Imaging the interior. Seismic tomography, tectonics, heat sources, heat transfer models, radioisotope distribution. Magnetic field origin. Origin of organic material within the earth. Identifying geophysical structures and water flow. Evaluating natural resources, mechanical stress in rock, underground fluid flow. Prerequisite: PHYS 346.

PHYS 350, Fluid Mechanics, 3 credits. The Bernoulli equation, momentum equations, potential flows, viscosity, supersonic flow, streamlines, open channels, turbo machines, Navier-Stokes equation. Prerequisites: MATH 162; PHYS 151 or 161; PHYS 152 or 162.

PHYS 352, Petroleum and Natural Gas Extraction, 3 credits. Exploration for crude petroleum and natural gas. Well logging, drilling, completing and equipping wells. Operating separators, emulsion breakers, and desilting equipment. Field lines for crude petroleum and natural gas. Neutron sources, nuclear magnetic resonance, radiation detectors, optical detectors, gamma sources, ultrasound, and piezoelectric detection of stress and fractures. Cement. Well-pad design. Streams and wetlands. Reclamation, permitting, pipeline design, water storage, producing crude petroleum. Mining and extracting oil and natural gas from shale and sands. Production of natural gas. Sulfur recovery from natural gas. Recovering hydrocarbon liquids. Applying geophysical theory to evaluate natural resources. Using geophysical instrumentation to evaluate natural resources. Remote sensing of natural resources. Minimizing environmental impact. Professional ethics. Prerequisite: PHYS 346. Co-requisite: PHYS 353L.

PHYS 353L, Petroleum and Natural Gas Extraction Laboratory, 1 credit. The laboratory for PHYS 352. Co-requisite: PHYS 352.

PHYS 360, Electromagnetic Theory, 3 credits. Vector analysis of electric and magnetic fields, Laplace’s equation in spherical and cylindrical coordinates, electrostatic images, polarization, dielectrics, electrostatic and magnetic energy, electric current, Biot-Savart law, Kirchhoff’s laws, electromagnetic induction, Maxwell’s equations, electromagnetic waves. Prerequisites: PHYS 151 or 161; PHYS 152 or 162; Pre- or co-requisite: MATH 230.

PHYS 478, Geophysics Research I, 1 credit. A study of the style of a scientific research paper. Researching scientific journals. Students will write a research paper based on a literature search. In combination with PHYS 479, this course satisfies the advanced composition requirement for general studies.

PHYS 479, Geophysics Research II, 1 credit. Continuation of PHYS 478. Students will conduct experimental research and present results in a research paper and an oral presentation. In combination with PHYS 478, this course satisfies the advanced composition requirement for general studies. Prerequisite: PHYS 478.

PHYS 497, Research Seminar I, 1 credit. A study of the style of a scientific research paper. Researching scientific journals. Students will write a research paper based on a literature search. In combination with PHYS 498, this course satisfies the advanced composition requirement for general studies.

PHYS 498, Research Seminar II, 1 credit. Continuation of PHYS 497. Students will conduct experimental research and present results in a research paper and an oral presentation. In combination with PHYS 497, this course satisfies the advanced composition requirement for general studies. Prerequisite: PHYS 497.

 

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